Lee develops a world rich in historical detail, crafts a plot wild with unexpected turns, and explores complex topics like colonization and identity An empowering and energetic adventure that celebrates friendship between women Kirkus Reviews starred review PRAISE FOR THE GENTLEMANS GUIDE TO VICE AND VIRTUE Tongue in cheek, wildly entertaining, and anachronistic in only the most delightful ways, this is a gleeful romp through history Monty is a hero worthy of Oscar Wilde Booklist starred review The books exquisite, bygone meter and vernacular sit comfortably on a contemporary shelf And the friction of racism, tyrannical entitled politicians, and misguided disapproval of homosexuality also have a relevance rooted in current cultures xeno and homophobia Austen, Wilde, and Indiana Jones converge in this deliciously anachronistic bonbon Kirkus Reviews starred review This is a witty, romantic, and exceedingly smart look at discovering ones place in the world A stunning powerhouse of a story for every collection School Library Journal starred review A gloriously swashbuckling affair Publishers Weekly starred review Mackenzi Lee This Monstrous Thing combines her knowledge of European history with a contemporary, comic sensibility to create an over the top romantic adventure complete with cliff hanging chapter endings and sometimes outrageous narration Monty is a licentious, flawed and engaging th century hero Shelf Awareness starred review Monty is pitch perfect as a yearning, self destructive, oblivious jerk of a hero who inspires equal parts sympathy, frustration, and adoration from reader A genre tribute, satire, and exemplar in one The Horn Book Gentlemans Guide to Vice and Virtueis the queer teen historical you didnt know was missing from your life Teen Vogue Best Queer Books to Celebrate PrideA rollicking ride that also turns a keen eye to issues like class, racism, homosexuality, and identity Brightly Careening from fete to fiasco on a Grand Tour of th century Europe, THE GENTLEMENS GUIDE TO VICE AND VIRTUE is a dizzying, dazzling, and roguishly romantic romp This book makes me want to unrequite my own love so I can requite him all over again Heidi Heilig, author of The Girl From EverywhereFelicity Montague is through with pretending she prefers society parties to books about bonesettingor that shes not smarter than most people she knows, or that she cares about anythingthan her dream of becoming a doctorA year after an accidentally whirlwind tour of Europe, which she spent evading highwaymen and pirates with her brother Monty, Felicity has returned to England with two goals in mindavoid the marriage proposal of Callum Doyle, a lovestruck suitor from Edinburgh, and enroll in medical school However, her intellect and passion will never be enough in the eyes of the administrators, who see men as the sole guardians of scienceBut then a small window of hope opens Dr Alexander Platt, an eccentric physician who Felicity idolizes, is looking for research assistants, and Felicity is sure that someone as forward thinking as her hero would be willing to take her on However, Platt is in Germany, preparing to wed Felicitys estranged childhood friend, Johanna Not only is Felicity reluctant to open old wounds, but she also has no money to make the tripLuckily, a mysterious young woman is willing to pay Felicitys way, so long as shes allowed to travel with Felicity disguised as her maid In spite of her suspicions, Felicity agrees, but once the girls true motives are revealed, Felicity becomes part of a perilous quest that leads them from the German countryside to the promenades of Zurich to secrets lurking beneath the Atlantic