GrUpAn endearing memoir from an acclaimed author This work picks up after the events of Barakat s previous title, Tasting the Sky A Palestinian Childhood, which left off inBarakat s lovely, lyrical style depicts an adolescence that will be simultaneously familiar to readers in its universal themes struggle to become one s own person, family life and its usual squabbles and very different in its backdrop of s Palestine The era was rife with political turmoilthe region was still reeling from the Six Day War inand the continued fallout With dreams of becoming a writer, Barakat embarked on a new path She found encouragement from the adults in her life, especially her mother, who decided she wants an education, too Barakat s recollections of her mother s educational pursuits are especially poignant She reflects on her mother s chafing at the religious and cultural norms that forced her to leave school after the sixth grade and to marry atBarakat wonderfully captures the mood of the time and place once again At times humorous and heartbreaking, this work will immerse readers in Barakat s experience, leaving them withperhapsa broadened worldview VERDICT Highly recommended for upper middle school and high school librariesElaine Baran Black, Georgia Public Library Service, Atlanta In this companion memoir toTasting the Sky A Palestinian Childhood, Barakat continues her tale of growing up in Palestine from, a politically turbulent time When her willingness to question and explore opens doors for her, Barakat receives encouragement and support from surprising sources, validating her sister s statement that being Palestinian teaches you to be ready for any destiny This is a compelling personal history, brimming with humor, wisdom, and empathy Publishers Weekly, starred review This intense memoir paints a dark picture of growing up in Israeli occupied Palestine, where we are made to live with no land, no country, no rights, no safety, and no respect for our dignity The author, a poet, picks up in , where her earlier memoir, Tasting the Sky, left off She recounts her years from second grade through high school, dividing the book into five sections based on their different homes in Palestine A poetic, deeply felt coming of age story Kirkus Reviews, starred review In this sequel to Tasting the Sky, a memoir and winner of the Arab American Book Award, Barakat moves beyond her early school years during the Six Day War and its uprooting aftermath She focuses on the years, when she a feisty protofeminist and her family shifted about in the occupied West Bank, trying to find a place that felt safe and like homeThe beauty of the writing is its clear eyed matter of fact ness Barakat doesn t plead for sympathy political or emotional she just recalls, in concrete detail, this particular world as she experienced it as a young woman, and the result is as inspiring as it is engrossing Booklist Barakat s lovely, lyrical style depicts an adolescence that will be simultaneously familiar to readers in its universal themes struggle to become one s own person, family life and its usual squabbles and very different in its backdrop of s PalestineBarakat wonderfully captures the mood of the time and place once again At times humorous and heartbreaking, this work will immerse readers in Barakat s experience, leaving them with perhaps a broadened worldview Highly recommended for upper middle school and high school libraries School Library JournalIn this companion memoir toTasting the Sky A Palestinian Childhood, Barakat continues her tale of growing up in Palestine from, a politically turbulent time When her willingness to question and explore opens doors for her, Barakat receives encouragement and support from surprising sources, validating her sister s statement that being Palestinian teaches you to be ready for any destiny This is a compelling personal history, brimming with humor, wisdom, and empathy Publishers Weekly, starred reviewThis intense memoir paints a dark picture of growing up in Israeli occupied Palestine, where we are made to live with no land, no country, no rights, no safety, and no respect for our dignity The author, a poet, picks up in , where her earlier memoir, Tasting the Sky, left off She recounts her years from second grade through high school, dividing the book into five sections based on their different homes in Palestine A poetic, deeply felt coming of age story Kirkus Reviews, starred reviewIn this sequel to Tasting the Sky, a memoir and winner of the Arab American Book Award, Barakat moves beyond her early school years during the Six Day War and its uprooting aftermath She focuses on the years, when she a feisty protofeminist and her family shifted about in the occupied West Bank, trying to find a place that felt safe and like homeThe beauty of the writing is its clear eyed matter of fact ness Barakat doesn t plead for sympathy political or emotional she just recalls, in concrete detail, this particular world as she experienced it as a young woman, and the result is as inspiring as it is engrossing BooklistBarakat s lovely, lyrical style depicts an adolescence that will be simultaneously familiar to readers in its universal themes struggle to become one s own person, family life and its usual squabbles and very different in its backdrop of s PalestineBarakat wonderfully captures the mood of the time and place once again At times humorous and heartbreaking, this work will immerse readers in Barakat s experience, leaving them with perhaps a broadened worldview Highly recommended for upper middle school and high school libraries School Library Journal