In all honestly I went into the book with already a poor view of mr Jones which isn t fair but i found it an interesting book and brought up some valid point the whole book felt very middle class , he seemed to be highlighting the plight of the lower classes to simply complain about the rich and only that, using them as of a tool than and genuine concern Additionally, I feel he over extends far to often, which is a shame because some of his valid arguments are just weakened buy pointless additions An example of this is how he compares madeleine mccann to Shannon Mathews and used it as an example of how the media treats the poor vs middle class rich This could of been a great chapter as if you look at how Sky conducted their interviews with Shannon s parents you can see how biased it is However this all falls apart because not only was Shannon fake kidnapped in an attempt to get the reward money by a relative, he seems to go on to suggest that all middle class children who go missing are treated the same as madeleine mccann, a girl who recently got another documentary series over a decade after she disappeared Overall it s a popular book for a reason, it s relatively well done but certain parts are unnecessary, personally I found the sizeable preface of 35 pages wildly unnecessary and somewhat self congratulatory as well as then 3 pages of great reviews in a book you ve already bought. The truth told in an intelligent and real account of the betrayal of the working class Owen Jones is an intelligent young man who researched this book and calls out the lie peddled by government that blames immigration for the problems of poverty when really it s really down to government policy. excellent book.I have met some of the middle classes who scorn the lower orders.They laugh at the working classes until austerity, like blood seeps slowly up the fabric of society and finally reaches the soles of their well heeled shoes, by then it will be to late to ask why are my socks wet Lets hope that never happens because if it is allowed to go that far, there will no answers there is a price for contempt, and the price for contempt of ones fellow human beings carries the greatest price of all.read the book and understand why Very left wing view of the world Superb examination of class war and how the vast majority have been positioned into blaming and despising the wrong people If your eyes are currently shut this book will reopen them. Excellent book and a straight forward review of his thesis.I would have wished for references to studies by third parties.The book at no point excuses the underclass , chav culture that has taken over the most neglected parts of our society Nor does it seek undermine the salt of the earth working class folk that are a fading group now It just provides the narrative.Just reading some of the one star reviews provides an insight into the ills of our world There are some frightening people about Their s is a world inhabited by low IQs. In modern Britain, the working class has become an object of fear and ridicule From Little Britain s Vicky Pollard to the demonization of Jade Goody, media and politicians alike dismiss as feckless, criminalized and ignorant a vast, underprivileged swathe of society whose members have become stereotyped by one, hate filled word chavs In this acclaimed investigation, Owen Jones explores how the working class has gone from salt of the earth to scum of the earth Exposing the ignorance and prejudice at the heart of the chav caricature, he portrays a far complex reality The chav stereotype, he argues, is used by governments as a convenient fig leaf to avoid genuine engagement with social and economic problems and to justify widening inequality When Chavs was first published init opened up the discussion of class in Britain Then, in the public debate after the riots of that summer, Owen Jones s thesis was proved right the working class were the scapegoats for everything that was wrong with Britain This new edition includes a new chapter, reflecting on the overwhelming response to the book and the situation in Britain today